Ivanka Trump, Mike Pence appearing 5 times in suburbs

- There are just 26 days until Election Day, and candidates and their surrogates are converging on the large battleground state of Pennsylvania.

Thursday, Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka will be visiting Chester, Delaware, Bucks and Montgomery counties.

This is her “Coffee with Ivanka” event schedule:
--9:30am at The Desmond, One Liberty Boulevard, Malvern 19355
--12 noon at The Drexelbrook, 4700 Drexelbrook Drive, Drexel Hill 19026
--2:30pm at Spring Mill Manor, 171 Jacksonville Road, Ivyland 18974

APP users: Click here to watch Ivanka Trump’s welcome and hear some of her remarks (embedded)

Later, Trump’s Republican running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will be speaking to two private audiences. At 6pm, he’ll be with the Lehigh County GOP in Orefield and at 7pm. he’ll be with the Northampton County GOP in Bethlehem.

Thursday, a newly-released Bloomberg Politics Pennsylvania Poll shows Clinton leads Trump 51-42 percent in a two-way race among likely voters.

Clinton leads Trump by the same margin, 48-39 percent, among likely voters in the state when third-party candidates are included.

The poll was taken Friday through Tuesday, entirely after the release of the 2005 video of Trump bragging about groping women.

Bloomberg says it’s the first major Pennsylvania survey to include attitudes captured after Sunday night's debate.

It adds, “Without Pennsylvania, Trump would still be shy of the 270 electoral votes needed to win even if he won Florida, Ohio, Iowa, and Nevada -- all states that voted Democratic in the last two presidential elections -- and all the other states fell as they did in 2012.”

How important are Philadelphia's suburbs?

There are more details on four key Philadelphia suburb counties -- Montgomery, Bucks, Chester and Delaware -- that represented 22 percent of the state's vote in 2012 and have historically crucial to determining which party carries the state.

In those once reliably Republican counties, Clinton leads 59-31 percent. That 28-point advantage in those counties is even 18 points larger than President Barack Obama's winning margin there in 2012.

In those counties tested, 68 percent of voters say they’re bothered "a lot" by the 2005 video of the Republican nominee bragging about groping women. That’s larger than statewide, where just 60 percent of likely voters were bothered a lot by the video, including 24 percent of Trump's own supporters.

In the state's U.S. senate race, Democratic challenger Katie McGinty is roughly even with Republican incumbent Pat Toomey 47-45 percent.

On the Democratic side for president, President Barack Obama himself will be speaking in Pittsburgh at 3:30pm at the "White House Frontiers Conference," where aides said he'd announce new funding for technology and research and tout innovations like self-driving cars and artificial intelligence. Obama, in an op-ed in the magazine Wired, said the U.S. needed to adapt its skills to address emerging threats like antibiotic-resistant "superbugs," cybersecurity and climate change.

"To accelerate that change, we need science," Obama said.

APP users: Click here to watch Obama laugh off, test claim by radio host he’s a demon (embedded)

Then, he'll spend two days in Ohio, as the number of states that could swing to either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump narrows to just a handful.

   Obama heads to Columbus on Thursday to be the featured speaker at an annual dinner benefiting Ohio Democrats and Gov. Ted Strickland, who is running to oust incumbent Republican Sen. Rob Portman. On Friday, Obama will hold a rally in Cleveland for Clinton emphasizing early voting, a major focus for Democrats across the U.S. this year.
 
   This week Obama entered the final 100 days of his presidency, and he's increasingly devoting his time to trying to push Clinton over the finish line in the presidential race. With Trump and Republicans threatening to undo much of what Obama has accomplished over the last eight years, campaigning for Democrats is the most productive way for Obama to try to protect his legacy.
 
   Ohio, with its diverse mix of cities and rural areas, is a coveted prize every four years, seen as a barometer for the shifts in the nation's political climate. This year, it's one of just four states that polls suggest are currently toss-ups between Clinton and Trump, along with Nevada, North Carolina and Florida.
 
   Trump, too, was setting his sights on Ohio on Thursday, with a speech in Columbus and an evening rally in Cincinnati. 
 
   The shrinking of the political battlefield reflects demographic shifts that have benefited Democrats in several states and Trump's struggles to expand his appeal to a broad cross-section of America. But Obama and Democrats have been wary not to take anything for granted, particularly as the final weeks of the campaign have taken a series of unpredictable turns.
 
   Obama and his wife, Michelle, are two of the country's most popular Democrats, making them the most effective voices to vouch publicly for Clinton. White House press secretary Josh Earnest said that makes the first couple particularly useful in freeing up Clinton to focus her limited time elsewhere.
 
   "The real value of having somebody as high-profile as the president or the first lady on the stump campaigning for you is that you don't have to also go there in order to get attention. You've got somebody else there who can make a forceful case in support of your candidacy," Earnest said.
 
   Hoping that broad disdain for Trump will sink other Republican candidates, Democrats have been particularly bullish this year about retaking the Senate, which would significantly strengthen Clinton's hand legislatively should she win the White House. Democrats had expected Strickland's race to be one of their better prospects to win a GOP-held Senate seat, but he has been running consistently behind Portman in the polls.
 
   Yet in a sign of how toxic Trump has become for other Republicans, Portman revoked his support for Trump after video emerged of Trump making offensive comments about women. Portman has said he's backing Trump's running mate Mike Pence instead.
Up Next:


  • Popular

  • Recent

Stories You May Be Interested In – includes Advertiser Stories