18th century church hoping 21st century technology can help recover from storm damage

As storms move across the area, a Montgomery County church is still trying to pick up the pieces after it was slammed by severe weather last month. Right now, the cost of rebuilding is just too much. So, they are using 21st century technology to help.

Upper Salford Township, Pa. church needs help after May severe storm.

 

“We’re just praying that we can figure this all out,” stated Old Goshenhoppen Church member Rose Kramer.

Guiding through a field in Upper Salford Township where it looks like Mother Nature’s version of dominoes.

“A lot of these trees, they’re well over 150 years,” said Kramer.

Kramer says she’s one of the many dealing with damage on her own property, after a damaging storm ripped through the township on May 29th.

Upper Salford Township, Pa. church needs help after May severe storm.

 

“I don’t take them lightly anymore. You just never expect it,” Kramer added.

She explains how overwhelmed she has felt in the face of the church damage.

“You go up there and you look at the church and say okay one tree fell. But, stand here and look at it and we own this,” Kramer explained.

Upper Salford Township, Pa. church needs help after May severe storm.

 

Miraculously, the giant tree once in front of the church somehow missed the historic building, founded in 1727. Hail did shatter glass on the steeple and powerwash the paint off.

“To me, it stood for a reason. It’s there for us,” she stated.

The giant field of tumbled trunks, dubbed the grove, also belongs to the church. More importantly, where they held their annual oyster picnic fundraiser for the past 141 years. The fundraiser that keeps the church running.

“Now we have $46,000 estimates and even that may be too low,” Kramer said. “There are so many tree services that don’t want to touch it. It’s just astronomical and then what are you supposed to do?” Kramer wonders.

Upper Salford Township, Pa. church needs help after May severe storm.

 

Relying on faith and, now, a GoFundMe.

“When you crest the hill, there is the church, there is the steeple. It absolutely tells you, yes, things are going to continue,” Kramer adds.

Kramer refuses to say this will end the church. But, they need help.

“It’s going to be a rough road,” Kramer states.